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Thread: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

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  1. #21

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    Going to have to Google boat-cloak. Also, reddleman! And contiguity.

    Had to make myself stop reading top of page 10. I might be finding this gripping before long. Wonder who the woman is?!

  2. #22

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    That woman is one of the most unforgettable characters in all of English literature. A stunning character and unforgettable. You won't ever forget her, I promise.

  3. #23

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    Oh, share your research! Anything you learn something, do share. I've never looekd up everything, so there's always much to learn each time through.

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    I don't think that boat-cloak was like this one, I think it was just a Navy type cloak, but it is an interesting link.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halkett_boat

    Another new word learned.
    contiguity
    noun

    • the state of bordering or being in contact with something.
      "nations bound together by geographical contiguity"
      • PSYCHOLOGY
        the sequential occurrence or proximity of stimulus and response, causing their association in the mind.
        "contiguity is necessary in all forms of learning"




    Eek at this link!
    The Reddlemen

    When I was young I was brought up near Stretford Ees which we called "down the meadows" and we used to see them loading the sheep and they'd have different coloured marks on them. Presumably this is what the reddleman would have marked them with back in the day?

    Fascinating...in a jokey way I often used to describe myself as a 'raddled ol' bag' to my friends etc. I'm weird I know. Thing is that word comes from reddleman!

    • n. A dealer in reddle or red chalk, usually a sort of peddler. Also raddleman, ruddleman.



  5. #25

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    Thanks for the research!! Our combined efforts will make us true Return of the N fans! I won't post till tonight because I need to think deeply and the grandbabes are waking up. The house becomes crazy when they're up and about. Well, it's just V so far, but once O is up, this house is crazy. V's watching Peppa Pig, so I can get a little catching up, but not to the level of concentration needed for Return of the N. I'll read your links tonight, too. Reddleman: I knew a little about that from previous readings, but I need to learn more; he'll be an important character, by the way. But not as important as the mystery woman.

  6. #26

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    Ah right...I was thinking he was a bit part!

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    Will post on pp. 9 and 10 tomorrow evening now that my daughter needs me to sit the children today and tonight. I'd take 'em to Busch Gardens tomorrow, but it's only in the 50s and I think that's too cold to have little Olivey outside. Anyway, I'll be back tomorrow evening with quotes and commentary for two days. Life happens, yes? But I've copied out the quotes for 9; just won't have a chance to read 10 today with the grandkids, not to mention sitting down to do some deep thinking as opposed to light writing.

  8. #28

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    There's no rush OV, life does interfere and so it should. The little ones come first. I will just wait on you and it's making the book stay in my memory longer this way of reading it. Very interesting.

    I can't picture the 'van' the woman is in with the reddleman walking alongside? Wide enough for two ponies anyways. Would it be a type of carriage or little wagon I wonder?

  9. #29

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    Uh-oh. I need to catch up. The woman I assumed was the woman with the bonfire. I need to catch up. If it's the other woman, she's not the central, unforgettable character. I think I wrote too soon and made an assumption. I'll catch up tomorrow morning. I have no commitments tomorrow; my brother arrives Tuesday; so I'll give Return of the N a careful reading of several pages. If the woman is in the van, she's a dear person, and nothing like the bonfire woman. Don't want to spoil this at all! Savoring it (or savouring it, as you spell it) is what this slow reading will be all about.

  10. #30

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    Default Re: Return of the Native, a Page a Day

    Page 9, reporting, soon to be followed by page 10 and page 11 today; that should catch me up to the page-a-day schedule but possibly not up to the mystery woman:

    "[The reddleman] is a curious, interesting, and nearly perished [1840-50, my note] link between obsolete forms of life and those which generally prevail" (9).

    The links we see between the past and the present feel poignant, disturbing, melancholy, and admonitory to me, all at the same time. I remember the tobacco barns of old--and how today, we see, instead, trailer-type tobacco barns. I remember the tobacco sleds pulled by mules, croker-sack constructions fun to ride in as a kid. These constructions of old are no longer built and it would be good if smoking itself were a thing of the past. However, in seeing the decaying old tobacco barns of yore, I have a sense of melancholy for the experiences that are no longer possible, yet there was a sweetness in those experiences too numerous to name.

    We'll see how well Hardy develops the reddleman and his job in the novel...and see whether we feel that sense of something Hardy felt connected to yet knew would become part of the never-to-be-recovered past, except in literature. And that is a power of literature and a great writer: to take us there. Believably.

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